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Thursday, September 25, 2014

Photo Essay: Exploring Schindler at the MAK Center

[Last updated 8/13/20 6:23 PM PT—minor edits to text and layout]

Austrian architect Rudolph Schindler was first sent to LA by Frank Lloyd Wright to oversee his Hollyhock House project (in Barnsdall Art Park, now named after oil heiress Aline Barnsdall).

But instead of moving back to Vienna, he stayed in Southern California and designed 500 projects, 150 of which were actually built.

Two of them are easily accessible for visiting (and sometimes for sound and video installations and other art projects) via the MAK Center.



The MAK Center is headquartered at Schindler's house and studio (now known simply as the Schindler House) in West Hollywood...



...on Kings Road, where Schindler and his wife Pauline lived.



Built in 1922, it's an example of early modern architecture—conceived as an experiment in communal living, where two couples (four individuals) were meant to cohabit.



The first couple to join the Schindlers was Clyde and Marian Chace (sometimes spelled "Chase")...



...followed by Richard and Dione Neutra (parents of Dion Neutra).



Like many of the modernist homes that followed later (like the Schaffer House, the Stahl House)...



...the Schindler House seamlessly integrates the inside with the outside...



...letting plenty of light in...



...and giving a generous view of the outdoors.



Similarly, the Mackey Apartments complex (located about four miles away in Mid-City)...



...was also split into four sections...



...each its own unique unit...



...(probably designed for more than one person each).



The building has since been split into five units...



...each with their own unique character – including patios, gardens and balconies...



...built-in furniture...



...and complex design.



The Republic of Austria purchased the building in 1995...



...and the Central Office of Architecture began restoration work that same year.



The complex also features a new addition...



...called the Garage Top...



...which features a box cantilevered over five renovated garages on the ground floor, no longer used as a car park but instead for special exhibitions and artist spaces, particularly for those artists and architects completing their six month residencies there.

Related Post:

Photo Essay: Schindler's Fitzpatrick-Leland House, Laurel Canyon
Photo Essay: Barnsdall Art Park's Hollyhock House, Closed for Renovations

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